Beer Braised Leg of Lamb by Sassy Radish

  • Recipe TypeEntree
  • Prep Time30 minutes
  • Yield4 - 6

As if the delicious mix of savory spices, honey and Stout used for this leg of lamb weren't enough, its relatively short prep and cook time make it a must for your next beer-inspired meal.

Ingredients

  • 7 to 8 pound leg of lamb (have your butcher remove the thighbone but leave the shin)
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 tbsp fresh rosemary
  • 3 tbsp fresh cilantro
  • 3 cardamom pods, ground
  • 3 cloves, ground
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon, ground
  • 1 tsp white pepper, ground
  • 3 tbps extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups stout beer or porter
  • 1/2 cup honey (I used pomegranate molasses)
  • 1 tsp juniper berries, crushed (optional, I didn’t have those)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 10 baby carrots

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  2. Open the leg of lamb and season the inside with half the garlic, half the thyme leaves, cardamom, cinnamon, rosemary, pepper, cilantro, 1 tablespoon olive oil, salt, and pepper.
  3. Tie the lamb closed with string. Place it in a roasting pan, season with salt and pepper, and brush it with olive oil.
  4. In a bowl mix the beer, honey, remaining garlic and thyme, juniper berries, and bay leaves. Pour this over the lamb and put the roasting pan into oven. Throw in sliced onions and baby carrots.
  5. Immediately turn the oven down to 325°F. Baste every 10 minutes. Cook 12 to 13 minutes per pound for medium rare or until internal temperature reaches 130 - 135°F.
  6. Remove the roast from the oven, cover it loosely with foil and allow it to rest for about 10 minutes before carving. Serve with pan drippings.

Leslie Green

The Sassy Radish blog is written by Olga Massov, a writer and a recipe tester/developer. After a decade in finance, Olga conceived Sassy Radish with the notion that eating well should be an everyday occurrence, that good food need not be complicated or precious, and that cooking with whole ingredients, sourced locally and ethically (as much as it is feasible) is easier, healthier, and more fulfilling.