Beer Sozzled Pork Spare Ribs with Sage and Garlic

  • Recipe TypeEntree
  • Prep Time20 minutes prep / 2 hours cooking time
  • Yield6

Matthew Evans, former chief restaurant reviewer for The Sydney Morning Herald, shares his recipe for spare ribs braised in wheat beer and seasoned with garlic and sage.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds pork spare ribs. These should be cut by the butcher into slices about 2cm thick; trim them if really fatty.
  • 2 bottles wheat beer 
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into modest chunks 
  • 2 large green onions, cut into pieces the length of your last thumb joint
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into batons the length of the onion
  • 6 - 7 cloves garlic, peeled and maybe roughly chopped
  • big handful sage leaves
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt and some freshly milled black pepper

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Pull the pork out of its bag and check it over. If it looks gritty, give it a rinse.
  3. Get the baking or roasting tray (or even a wide casserole dish) and lay the pork on the bottom in one layer. 
  4. Push the potatoes in-between the meat so it will be covered with the beer. 
  5. Scatter the onions, carrots, garlic and sage over. 
  6. Sprinkle evenly with the salt and add beer to the pan. You want the meat to be just about submerged, maybe fully submerged, but not by much. 
  7. If you need a little more liquid, use water.
  8. Cover the tray with foil and pop it into the oven. Cook for one hour. 
  9. Take the foil off and cook for another 30 minutes, so the top of the pork starts to color and poke above the sauce. 
  10. Turn the meat and cook another 30 minutes. Lay the meat on top of the veggies for best effect.
  11. You want the pork to look browned but not burnt, and the sauce to be moist but not overly runny. Add a touch of water if it dries out.
  12. Remove from oven and serve immediately.

Leslie GreenMatthew Evans was once trained as a chef, before crossing to the dark side of the industry and became a restaurant reviewer. After five years and 2,000 restaurant meals as the chief reviewer for The Sydney Morning Herald, Matthew realized that chefs don’t have the best produce in the land, normal people who live close to the land do. So he moved to Tasmania, to a small patch of earth where he’s raising pigs and sheep, milking a cow and waiting for his chickens to start laying.